Don’t Do This…

Things You Shouldn’t Do With A Broken Hard Drive #2

A) Don’t Put It In A Fridge Or A Freezer

Hard Drive in FridgeThere’s a belief that putting a faulty hard drive in a freezer or a fridge will make it work again… Yes really….

NO IT WON’T – it’ll just make it go cold and get you strange looks when you’re mother-in-law comes round and checks the contents of freezer.

It’s an internet myth – just Google something like “broken hard drive put in freezer” and read all about it… You’ll notice that in the majority of posts it’s a case of “I heard of a person who….”, or “A friend of a friend did it”

Just Take a Second To Think About It…

Hard Disk Drive in a FreezerLet’s say your drive is running slowly (see ‘Common Faults’) or your drive is making a clicking sound (see ‘Mechanical Faults’) – what is chilling or freezing it actually going to do? It’s not going to somehow repair a faulty physical component of the hard drive… It’s just going to make it cold and it certainly won’t be doing anything good to the hard drive.

 

 

B) Changing The Controller Boards

Hard Drive Controller BoardIt Used To Work – Back at the start of the 21st Century, when the capacities of hard drives were small (the largest drive available back then was about 10GB), it was occasionally possible to swap the controller board on a broken drive with the controller board from an identical drive and bring the broken drive back to life. This was possible mostly on Quantum Fireball and some Seagate drives.

Now It Doesn’t – Whilst the physical size of a hard drive has remained the same, their capacities – the amount of data they can hold – has grown exponentially, and so has the technology that ensures the drives function correctly.
Modern drives contain what is known as ‘adaptive data’ – information that is unique to that hard drive – and without it the drive won’t function correctly. Swapping the controller board on a broken drive with the controller board from an identical drive no longer works because the adaptive data isn’t transferred.